revealing errors

This week’s reading talked about the powers of technology and the history and context behind revealing errors.

The article talked about print technology. It described print technology as having important effects on what is printed and how and these effects are often exposed by errors. When describing certain types of errors the printing technology brought, they discussed how, unlike a scribe who could re-write the errors found in the first draft, these technologies don’t have that capacity. For example, if someone were to make a typo, such as accidentally type the letter a instead s the technology wouldn’t be able to pick up and fix this error. Since this error is not fixed, a different message is sent than originally intended by the messenger.

It is almost like a giant game of telephone, as the message is sent through different mediums and is sent through a channel, the original message always gets messed up and changed somehow. This can totally confuse and change the original intention of the message. Thus this error reflects, or “reveals”,  the errors of the technological system.

In revealing this error, users are able to recognize that an error was made. If we were to look at this concept in a broader aspect, we can relate error to revealing the errors of the world and the system that the world lives in. Doesn’t this definition seem more powerful?

When we look at revealing error in this aspect, we realize that error opens our eyes and has the power to expose the world for what it really is: imperfect. With users and members of society having the ability to view the world in this way, the ability and production of cultural and political movements can be made.

Glitch art is one of the ways social and political “errors” are revealed to society. This art makes a statement by showing us the exact error  or mess up in the world. Thus, can we extend glitch art’s power far beyond the ability to make a statement to try and inflict change? Does glitch art have the power to create huge social movements and reforms? Does glitch art have the power to upset society? I think that it does.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “revealing errors

  1. You’re totally right, if glitch has the ability to reveal the technology underneath, in a way, it also reveals the presence of a larger monolithic structure, a society that takes advantage of the digital landscape to perpetuate certain ideologies while also using the technology to hide their intentions, conscious nor not. The glitch completely underminds their intentions, and that is what gives glitch its power. I feel that glitch should be utilized as a tool for change. Glitch doesn’t try to tear down the hegemony, all it simply does is reveal it, and thus “the truth will set you free” (yes, I am appropriating a biblical quote in a more secular and in my opinion a more fitting context)

    Like

  2. I really enjoyed reading your summary of the article “revealing errors” I especially liked the question you asked In revealing this error, users are able to recognize that an error was made. If we were to look at this concept in a broader aspect, we can relate error to revealing the errors of the world and the system that the world lives in. Doesn’t this definition seem more powerful?” I defiantly think that it does make it more powerful and by exposes errors we are taking back the humanistic aspect of living. no matter how hard technology tries to mimic human behavior or thought it will simple never be human. I think its important to remember this and remember not everything our technology says is right its not some sort of “god that knows everything” instead technology like everything else makes errors and when exposing these errors we are reminded of this! great blog post! great ideas!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s