Revealing Errors- Make up Blog

The article by Benjamin Mako Hill is interesting and looks at all aspects of words and errors that coincide with them.  He brings up good points about how errors and machinery grew together, and changed with each other.

He starts by laying out how people produced the first errors when typing. The more complicated the machinery the more difficult the error was to fix due to the ability to print large batches. When the first printing presses were introduced, it also introduced many types of errors due to misspellings and misrecognized letters. These mistakes would attempt to be corrected by hand or a second transcriber, but all the copies were never fixed. While these types of large scale printing errors are less likely today, due  to machinery’s ability to catch our mistakes, these problems still exist, but in new forms.  With new technologies, of course comes new problems. The invention of the QWERTY keyboard ramped up efficiency, but due to human errors, mistakes were still occurring. As technology progressed, so did the need for a more advanced typing tool. T9 was invented to let users type with a numeric keypad. However, this tool’s effectiveness was questionable. With three or four letters being the same button, mistakes were being made, many even unrecognized. Letters would get scrambled, leading to words coming out completely wrong. This process of growing our communication with our technology shows that while technology has grown as a field, some of the basic functions still lack in performance. The need for efficiency in whatever the case is needed. Even in the future if everything is by voice command, the need to be clearly understood is crucial. Although, realistically this will never be achieved, as humans make countless errors talking every day. No matter what form of communication, errors and mistakes will occur due to voices, misprints and auto corrects. Even as the demand for stronger technology grows, the same basic problems continue.

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